Parkinson & Byrne 2017

Mary Parkinson has published some of the experiments from her PhD:

Parkinson, M., & Byrne, R. M. (2017). Judgments of Moral Responsibility and Wrongness for Intentional and Accidental Harm and Purity Violations. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, in press.

The abstract is as follows:

‘Two experiments examine whether people reason differently about intentional and accidental violations in the moral domains of harm and purity, by examining moral responsibility and wrongness judgments for violations that affect others or the self. The first experiment shows that intentional violations are judged to be worse than accidental ones, regardless of whether they are harm or purity violations—for example, Sam poisons his colleague versus Sam eats his dog, when participants judge how morally responsible was Sam for what he did, or how morally wrong was what Sam did. The second experiment shows that violations of others are judged to be worse than violations of the self, regardless of whether they are harm or purity violations, when their content and context is matched—for example, on a tropical holiday Sam orders poisonous starfruit for dinner for his friend, or for himself, versus on a tropical holiday Sam orders dog meat for dinner for his friend, or for himself. Moral reasoning is influenced by whether the violation was intentional or accidental, and whether its target was the self or another person, rather than by the moral domain, such as harm or purity.’

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Couto, Quelhas & Byrne 2017

Marta Couto has published some of the experiments she carried out for her PhD:

Couto, M., Quelhas, A. C., & Byrne, R. M. (2017). Advice conditionals about tips and warnings: interpretations and inferences. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, in press.

The abstract is as follows:

‘Two experiments examine how people interpret and reason about advice conditionals, such as tips, e.g., ‘if you study more your grades will improve’, and warnings, e.g., ‘if you stop exercising you will gain weight’. Experiment 1 showed that when participants reason about whether a tip or warning could be true in different situations, their judgments correspond to a biconditional or conditional interpretation on about half of all trials, but to an enabling or tautology interpretation on many others. Experiment 2 showed that participants make few modus ponens and tollens inferences from tips and warnings, and more modus ponens inferences from tips than warnings. The implications for alternative theories are discussed.’

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Lab talks 2016

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Lunch in the Dining Hall in Trinity after Orlando Espino’s talk,  from left: Orlando Espino (La Laguna University, Tenerife, Spain), Shane Timmons (Trinity), Isabel Orenes (UNED, Madrid, Spain), David Beltran (La Laguna University, Tenerife, Spain), Evie Alkin (Trinity), Madhav Bhargav (Trinity), Marta Straga (Ca’Foscari University of Venice, Italy), Sabrina Haimovici (Buenos Aires University, Argentina), Ruth Byrne (Trinity).

 

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Interdisciplinary Workshop on Counterfactual Thinking at University of Toronto

Patricia Ganea, Daphna Buchsbaum, and Angela Nyhout organised a wonderful workshop at the University of Toronto on November 4th and 5th 2016.  The line-up for both days contained a fantastic set of talks about counterfactuals from many different perspectives within cognitive science, developmental psychology, social psychology, linguistics, philosophy, and neuroscience, as well as an excellent poster session.

Videos of the talks are available here.

Day 1- November 4, 2016
University College – Room 179 (15 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto)
9:00 – 9:10 Opening Remarks: Patricia Ganea
9:10 – 10:05 Ruth Byrne
10:05 – 11:00 Sarah Beck
11:30 – 12:25 Michela Ippolito
2:00 – 2:55 Neal Roese
2:55 – 3:50 Rachel Smallman
4:20 – 5:15 Kang Lee
5:30 – 7:00 Poster Session – Sidney Smith Hall Room 560A

Day 2 – November 5, 2016
University College – Room 179 (15 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto)
9:00 – 9:55 Paul Harris
9:55 – 10:50 Angela Nyhout
11:20 – 12:25 Brian Leahy
2:00 – 2:55 Chris Lucas
2:55 – 3:50 Daphna Buchsbaum
4:20 – 5:15 Eva Rafetseder
5:15 – 6:10 Felipe De Brigard
6:10 – 6:20 Closing Remarks

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Workshop on scientific imagination at LSE

Fiora Sallis organised a very interesting workshop on the scientific imagination and epistemic representations at the London School of Economics on 28th October 2016. The program brought together philosophers and psychologists for a set of stimulating and detailed discussions:

Programme
10:00–11:15 Ruth Byrne (University of Dublin):
“Counterfactual Thought”
LAK.206
11:15–11:45 Coffee Break LAK.G.01C
11:45–13:00 Catharine Abell (University of Manchester):
“Epistemic Problems with Eliciting Imaginings”
LAK.206
13:00–14:15 Lunch
14:15–15:30 Fiora Salis (LSE):
“Capturing the Scientific Imagination”
LAK.206
15:30–16:00 Coffee Break LAK.G.01C
16:00–17:15 Timothy Williamson (University of Oxford):
“Counterfactuals and Thought experiments”
LAK.206
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International Thinking Conference, Providence, US, and Poznan reasoning week, Poland

International Conference on Thinking

Members of the lab gave talks at the International Conference on Thinking at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island in August.

Shane Timmons gave a talk (Timmons & Byrne) on ‘Cognitive fatigue and moral reasoning’.

Sabrina Haimovici gave a talk (Haimovici & Byrne) on ‘What type of evidence counts for dual process theories of conditional reasoning?’.

Ruth Byrne gave a talk (Byrne & Almeida) on ‘Counterfactuals, Semi-factuals, and Judgments about Morally Good Acts’ as part of a symposium on ‘Counterfactual thoughts about alternatives to reality’ organised by Ruth Byrne.

Raluca Briazu gave a talk (Briazu, Deeprose, Ganis, & Walsh) on ‘Thinking counterfactually, acting immorally – the link between counterfactual thought and lies’ also as part of the symposium on ‘Counterfactual thoughts about alternatives to reality’.

Ruth Byrne gave a talk (Byrne & Espino) on ‘Counterfactual conditionals and embodied simulations’ as part of the symposium on ‘Mental models and reasoning’ organised by Ruth Byrne.

The full program with abstracts is available at:
http://easychair.org/smart-program/ICT2016/2016-08-04.html

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Poznan reasoning week, Poland

Two conferences organised by Mariusz Urbanski on ‘Logic and Cognition’ and ‘Formal models of reasoning and argumentation’ in Poznan, Poland featured keynote addresses by Ruth Byrne:

Counterfactual conditionals and the mental representation of possibilities at ‘2nd Logic and Cognition’

and

Counterfactual thoughts and the controllability of events at ’14th ArgDiap: Formal models of reasoning and argumentation’

The full program is available at here

 

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Summer School on Cognitive Sciences at the University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada, June 20th-July 1st 2016

The summer school in cognitive sciences at the University of Quebec at Montreal organised by Serge Robert, began with a session on reasoning chaired by Henry Markovits and featuring talks by Ruth Byrne, Geoff Goodwin, Henry Markvits, David Over and David Lagnado.

The full program for the summer school is available here:

A video of the talk by Ruth Byrne is available here:

 

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